1. BROWN RECLUSE SPIDER

brown recluse spider

Environment:

  • Woodpiles and sheds
  • Closets, garages, and cellars
  • Any places that are dry and undisturbed
  • Favor cardboard indoors because it mimics tree bark

Identification:

  • Adults are 1/4″ to 3/4″ body length
  • Dark violin shaped image on body at leg attachment
  • Has 6 eyes arranged in pairs (most spiders have 8 eyes)

Threats:

  • Bite is severely toxic to humans
  • Can cause significant injury
  • Can cause tissue loss and necrosis

2. BLACK WIDOW SPIDER

black widow spider

Environment:

  • Woodpiles and piles of rubble
  • Under rocks and in hollow tree stumps
  • In sheds, garages, basements, and crawl spaces

Identification:

  • Adults are 1/2″ in body length
  • Female is shiny black with a red hourglass marking on the underside of the abdomen
  • Hourglass marking may range in color from yellow orange to red
  • Marking shape may range from an hourglass to a dot

Threats:

  • Toxic to humans
  • Potentially fatal, especially to the young and the elderly
  • Venom affects the nervous system
  • Most common symptoms are headache, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, pyrexia, and hypertension
  • Anti-venom is available

3. MOUSE SPIDER

mouse spider

Environment:

  • Ground dwellers with burrows more than 3 feet deep
  • Male wanders during the day, often in search of females

Identification:

  • Adult is up to 1-1/2″ in body length
  • Male often has a bright red head and elongated fangs

Threats:

  • Known to cause severe illness, especially to young children
  • Usually not aggressive unless provoked

4. BLACK HOUSE SPIDER

black house spider

Environment:

  • Dry habitats in secluded locations
  • In window framing, under eaves and gutters, and in brickwork
  • In sheds and toilets
  • Among rocks and bark

Identification:

  • Adult is about 1/2″ in body length
  • Dark brown to black velvet textured appearance

Threats:

  • Poisonous but not lethal
  • Can cause severe pain around the bite, heavy sweating, muscle pain, vomiting, and headache

5. WOLF SPIDER

wolf spider

Environment:

  • Ground dwellers with burrow retreats
  • Commonly found around the home in garden areas
  • Has a silk lined burrow that is sometimes covered by leaves or grass
  • Roams at night to hunt prey

Identification:

  • Adult is 1/2″ to more than 1″ in body length
  • Mottled gray to brown in color
  • Distinct Union Jack marking on its back

Threats:

  • Poisonous but not lethal
  • Can cause a painful bite
  • Usually non-aggressive but will bite if provoked

6. TRAPDOOR SPIDER

trapdoor spider

Environment:

  • Ground dweller with burrow retreat
  • Burrow is usually lined with silk and about 10″ deep x 1″ wide
  • Prefers nesting in drier exposed locations around the home

Identification:

  • Adult is about 1-1/2″ in body length
  • Brown to dark brown in color
  • Heavily covered in fine hair
  • Male has boxing glove shaped “feelers” at front of its head

Threats:

  • Nontoxic to humans
  • Usually timid and rarely bites

7. ORB WEAVER SPIDER

orb weaver spider

Environment:

  • Often found in summer garden areas around the home
  • Spin large circular web that can be 6 feet or more
  • Web is often between buildings or shrubs

Identification:

  • Adults are 2/3″ to more than 1″ in body length
  • Has a bulbous abdomen
  • Often colorful with a dark brown to light brown pattern
  • Most common has a purplish bulbous abdomen with fine hairs

Threats:

  • Nontoxic to humans
  • Non-aggressive and rarely bite

8. ST. ANDREWS CROSS SPIDER

st andrews cross spider

Environment:

  • Web weaver
  • Usually found in summer garden areas around the home

Identification:

  • Adult is 1/4″ to 1/2″ in body length
  • Abdomen is striped yellow and brown
  • Usually sits upside down in the middle of its web forming a cross

Threats:

  • Nontoxic to humans
  • Usually non-aggressive

9. HUNTSMAN SPIDER

huntsman spider

Environment:

  • Prefer to live under the flaking bark of trees
  • Also found under flat rocks and under eaves or within roof spaces of buildings
  • Often wanders into homes and is found perched on a wall

Identification:

  • Adult is around 1/2″ in body length
  • Has long legs
  • Hairy
  • Buff to beige in color with dark patterns on body

Threats:

  • Nontoxic to humans
  • Usually non-aggressive except in summer when females are guarding egg sacs or young

How Can You Prevent Spiders?

  • Remove nesting sources like clutter and debris in your yard and crawl spaces
  • Trim weeds around your building foundation
  • Eliminate or shield outdoor lights as these attract other insects which are a source of food for spiders
  • Seal cracks and crevices around your home and install screens and door sweeps to eliminate points of entry for spiders
  • Use a vacuum cleaner to remove webs, spiders, and egg sacs from your home
  • Call a pest control¬†company¬†to schedule quarterly, preventative service